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The Find: iPad Covers and Password Managers

Take a look at some of the latest tech lifestyle trends

Jan 2, 2014
You can judge this book by its cover

Part of the genius of the iPad (and some of its tablet copy-cats) is that it’s part industrial art and part leading-edge technology. But using a tablet to its full potential without damaging it in the process? That’s a tough one. The legions of bendable plastic and cloth tablet cases out there work, sure, but the effect on an iPad is akin to putting snow-pants on a supermodel. That’s why we’ve dug up a couple that equal – even top – the iconic tablet’s style.

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$119
Available at Restoration Hardware, Edmonton and Calgary
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$215
Available at Holt Renfrew, Calgary and Edmonton
Own your own passwords
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Illustration Kickpixel

It wasn’t so long ago that passwords hinted at intrigue and excitement, of unlocking secret clubs, exclusive groups or private parts of your life. Well, no longer. Now passwords are a form of digital drudgery that we approach with the same weariness as flossing or eating broccoli.

The good news is it doesn’t have to be that way.

If you’re looking for a free, open-source password manager, KeePass (keepass.info) is a good bet, while DashLane (dashlane.com) offers a free password manager that you can also download to your smartphone, along with a premium upgrade that allows users to access a wider universe of services. Feel like paying? The latest iteration of 1password, the Rolls Royce of the group, starts at $39.99 on the Apple Store.

But what if you’re a luddite or just uncomfortable giving your passwords to a third-party? Well, we’ve got an old-fashioned life hack for you to use. Create an alphanumeric root – say, the address of a place you know, or a battle from the Second World War – and then create a rule for attaching a site-specific tail to it (for example, the first and fourth letters of the website you’re on, separated by an underscore). Once you memorize the root and the rule, remembering passwords is a snap. And when it’s time to change up your passwords, all you need to do is change the root.

Here’s an example

Root: Stalingrad1942
Website: Amazon.ca
Password: Stalingrad1942_az

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