September 2016

The Briefing

Canada's countless restrictions on the movement of goods and services

Across the world, populists and demagogues rage against free trade. Canada may object, but … glass houses >

 

Canadian home builders watch for proposed changes to Municipal Government Act

Ryan Scott, President of the Canadian Homebuilders Association, discusses the review of the Municipal Government Act  >

 

Clinton or Trump – Who’s better for Alberta?

We size up the candidates >

 

How many parking spaces are enough in Edmonton's downtown?

The Katz Group recently proposed an 800-stall gravel parking to serve Roger's Place >

 

Power Purchase Arrangements: a deal that could cost taxpayers $2 billion

Residential and commericial electricty users could be on the hook for losses >

 

The vaping trend has Albertans racing to open up shop

Vape shops are popping up everywhere. Is the boom bound to bust? >

 

What the Twittersphere is saying about Alberta's politicans

We'll give you a hint: you wouldn't want it said about you >

 

Features

Alberta's Craft Brewing Industry Is Changing The Way We Think About Beer

The burgeoning craft brewing industry is bringing together small businesses across the province  >

 

The case for coal: the proposed open pit mine in Crowsnest Pass

Amid the phase-out of coal-fired power in Alberta, Crowsnest Pass confronts the possibilty of a new mine – and the existential dilemma that comes with it >

 

business person of the year

Bill Comrie, Business Person of the Year 2003

Founder and CEO, the Brick >

 

Charlie Fischer, Business Person of the Year 2005

President and CEO of Nexen >

 

Individually Outstanding. Collectively Phenomenal.

 

John Forzani, Business Person of the Year 2002

CEO and Chairman of the Forzani Group  >

 

Rick George, Business Person of the Year 2001

CEO, Suncor >

 

The 20th anniversary of the Business Person of the Year award

We look back at a legacy of leadership with a retrospective of the greats of Alberta business >

 

Venture 250

A new hope for Alberta's 250 biggest companies

"There were no illusions that it wasn’t going to be a rough year. But, emerging from the wreckage, many of Alberta’s biggest companies are stronger – or at least smarter – for it" >

 

Chinese tech giant Foxconn agrees to buy money-losing SMART Technologies

In May, Foxconn Technology Group announced an agreement to buy SMART Technologies’ outstanding shares for a cash payment of $4.50 per common share >

 

Eight years later, we check in on the provincial government's AIMCo experiment

Almost every Albertan has an interest in AIMCo's performance, so another amazing year under its belt is a really good thing  >

 

First Calgary Financial and Chinook Credit Union are reaping the benefits of their 2014 merger

The financial institutions merged operations in November 2014 and has been exceeding targets and increasing capital since >

 

Step right up and test your knowledge of this year’s Venture 250 list

 

The 25 best-paid CEOs in Alberta

Read 'em and weep >

 

The growers and shrinkers of the V250

In a year that was all peaks and valleys, who hit the highest highs, and who almost lost it all? >

 

The mergers and acquisitions of Alberta's oil patch

One of the deepest oil routs in memory spelled the end for a long list of oil and gas producers in 2015 >

 

The No Bullshit Legacy of Hunter Harrison

One of the most charming, charismatic and feared CEOs of recent memory steps down as CEO of Canadian Pacific Railway in June 2017. What’s next for Canada’s largest railway?  >

 

The Venture 250

The definitive list of Alberta’s Biggest Companies >

 

The Venture 250’s most shorted stocks

Shorting a stock can mean big payoffs if you play your cards right and big losses if you don’t. >

 

Executive Compensation

The 25 best-paid CEOs in Alberta

Read 'em and weep >

 

The Venture 250

These are the 250 highest grossing companies in Alberta for 2016 >

 

Focus On Aboriginal Business

In Search of Capital: The struggle First Nations entrepreneurs face when trying to secure funds

Why is that, and what can be done to change it? >